Covid-19 Update

Max are pleased to confirm that our teams are still fully operational in line with the latest government guidelines. This includes our off-site team at ONS. We do understand, however, that for many businesses and institutions this is unfortunately still not the case. We continue to wish you well during this difficult period and look forward to somewhat easier times, hopefully by Spring 2021.

If you would like to schedule a call for a future date, please complete our contact form indicating a preferred day. We have decided to freeze our prices until May 1st 2021 to ensure that our customers are not penalised by the ongoing restrictions. We may decide to extend this date further still.

In the meantime, please do take a look at our podcasts page . The passion, enthusiasm and insight from our guest speakers has been inspirational, especially given the circumstances.

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King’s College

King’s College
Images courtesy of King's College London

One of the most momentous scientific discoveries of our era is that the structure of hereditary material is contained within every living organism’s cells. Francis Crick and James Watson proposed a structure for DNA in 1953, and their model was underpinned by work conducted three years beforehand at the Medical Research Council Biophysics Unit of King’s College London. The prime movers in obtaining the raw data for Crick and Watson to help formulate their groundbreaking discovery were Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. In 1950, Wilkins and Franklin had been responsible for refining X-Ray technology to a new level of clarity, resolution and sophistication in the newly-formed Medical Research Council Biophysics Unit of King’s College in London.

Because of the very precious nature of these X-Ray films, Max was given the task of scanning them onsite at King’s College. The X-Ray images were originally captured on a wide range of film sizes, ranging from small images right up to long rolls. The rolled images were scanned in stages and later joined together by our highly skilled image restoration experts.

For further details of the services we offer, please contact us on 020 8309 5445 or via our contact page.

King’s College

How Max captured and scanned a collection of precious x-ray films.

One of the most momentous scientific discoveries of our era is that the structure of hereditary material is contained within every living organism’s cells. Francis Crick and James Watson proposed a structure for DNA in 1953, and their model was underpinned by work conducted three years beforehand at the Medical Research Council Biophysics Unit of King’s College London. The prime movers in obtaining the raw data for Crick and Watson to help formulate their groundbreaking discovery were Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. In 1950, Wilkins and Franklin had been responsible for refining X-Ray technology to a new level of clarity, resolution and sophistication in the newly-formed Medical Research Council Biophysics Unit of King’s College in London.

Because of the very precious nature of these X-Ray films, Max was given the task of scanning them onsite at King’s College. The X-Ray images were originally captured on a wide range of film sizes, ranging from small images right up to long rolls. The rolled images were scanned in stages and later joined together by our highly skilled image restoration experts.

For further details of the services we offer, please contact us on 020 8309 5445 or via our contact page.


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King’s College
Images courtesy of King's College London